We just launched real Internet Explorers for Browserling. They include IE6, IE7, IE8 and IE9. The free plan includes IE9 and our paid plan lets you use IE6, IE7 and IE8. Before this upgrade we were using IETester as a replacement for IE{6,7,8}, which was super buggy and we had a lot of complaints about not having real IEs. So now we have them!

I’m currently involved in a project to write a fairly extensive set of best practices for front-end development. Alongside myself, this project includes input from a fair cross-section of my peers in the front-end development community. These best practices will be implemented alongside a coding standard as standards for development within the organisation I work for, and hopefully many other organisations when they are published. Of all the standards that a front-end team might want to implement, those that concern the identification and graceful degradation of cross-browser feature sets can be the hardest to define. With that in mind, I’ve been poking around the front-end community looking for possible solutions. By far the most common approach—and one that gains an astounding level of attention in the community—is to implement Modernizr, a JavaScript feature sniffer created by Faruk Ate?, Paul Irish and Alex Sexton. Unfortunately, despite my respect for the developers involved, I just can’t advocate Modernizr as a solution. Let me explain why; but first, let’s revisit some concepts that are going to be quite relevant…